Patron of the Arts

business owner [Lat., = Like a father?], One who agrees? influential support for a person, cause, art or institution.

Patronage existed in various ancient cultures, but it was primarily a Roman institution. In Roman law, the lord was patronus (protector or defender) in relation to his liberties and to others, known as his clients, whom he represented. in the senate and before the courts. Under the Roman Empire, the term was applied to people like Maecenas who supported artists and writers. Perhaps the most edifying patronage took place in Italy during the Renaissance under patrons such as the Medici, Sforza and many popes.

Francis I of France with the support of his sister Margaret of Navarre were distinguished patrons of art and letters; a famous English patron was Lord Chesterfield. Yet? From ancient times, Christians have honored the patron saints as guardians of persons, institutions, places, and crafts. Historically, artists have depended on both institutionality (e.g., government and church) and individual patronage; Picasso Guernica and Chagall's stained glass windows are examples of commissioned works. Universities and private foundations have also become important sources of patronage for artists.

From the ancient world? Since then, the patronage of the arts has been important in the history of art. Is it known in the greatest detail referring to medieval Europe? and renaissance, although patronage can be identified in feudal Japan, in the traditional kingdoms of Southeast Asia and elsewhere - the patronage of art tended to appear? wherever a royal or imperial system and an aristocracy dominated a society. and controlled a significant share? of resources. Samuel Johnson defined an employer as one who looks anxiously at a man who is struggling. for life ?? in the water? and after? what reached the ground, bury it? with help? .

Leaders, nobles, and wealthy people used patronage of the arts to support their political ambitions, social positions, and prestige. Meaning? the patrons functioned as sponsors. Most languages except? of English? still use? the term patron, derived from the name of Gaius Maecenas, a generous friend and adviser to the Roman emperor Augustus. Some patrons, such as the Doctors of Florence, used artistic patronage to cleanse the world. the wealth that was perceived? as obtained? by wear ?. The patronage of art was especially important in the creation of religious art. The Roman Catholic Church? Subsequent Protestant groups also sponsored art and architecture, as seen in churches, cathedrals, painting, and sculpture. And you know me.

While sponsoring artists and putting the work of art into operation? are the best known aspect of the patronage system, other disciplines have also benefited from patronage, including those who have studied natural philosophy? (pre-modern science), musicians, writers, philosophers, alchemists, astrologers, and other scientists.

Artists as diverse and important as Chrétien de Troyes, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson sought and enjoyed the support of noble or ecclesiastical patrons. With the rise of bourgeois and capitalist social forms in the middle of the nineteenth century European culture? has moved away from its system of patronage to the above publicly supported system of museums, theaters, mass audiences? and mass consumption, which is familiar in the contemporary world. This type of continuous system? in several fields of the arts.

Although the nature of sponsors has changed - from churches to charitable foundations and from aristocrats to plutocrats - the term patron has a more neutral connotation. than in ?? politics ?. It can simply refer to the direct (often financial) support of an artist, for example through grants. In the latter part of the twentieth century, the academic subdiscipline? of patronage studies began to? evolve, recognizing the important and often neglected role that the phenomenon of patronage played in cultural life? of previous centuries.

 

Become a Patron of the Arts

 

Art Patrons from the Art Archive Gallery v? I invite? s? you? take its place in history. Join us for the protection of priceless cultural wonders so that they inspires future generations.
Involve? Iv? as Patrons becoming an official member of ArhivaDeArta. Through your membership, you will support contemporary artists, art projects for children who love art, restoration work, conservation projects and equipment for restoration laboratories, as well as capital improvements and the acquisition of works of art? valuable.
Our employers receive many exclusive benefits, in addition to the honor of preserving one of the largest art collections? from Romania, now and for the following years.
The benefits of the subscription include: the subscription to the IT Bulletin? from the director of ArhivaDeArta and invitations to annual member events.
Select a package to contribute to the Boss Mission, discover the benefits of becoming a Boss or contact and us

Junior
?two hundred
/ annually
  • valid for people up to 35 years
  • Subscription to the IT Bulletin? Patrons of the Arts? from the Director of ArhivaDeArta
  • Invitations to special events hosted by ArhivaDeArta
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Family
? 600
/ annually
  • 2 adults + children under 18 years
  • 10% Discount on purchases
  • Invitations to special events hosted by ArhivaDeArta
  • Subscription to the IT Bulletin? Patrons of the Arts? from the Director of ArhivaDeArta
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Individual
? 400
/ annually
  • 10% Discount on purchases
  • Subscription to the IT Bulletin? Patrons of the Arts? from the Director of ArhivaDeArta
  • Invitations to special events hosted by ArhivaDeArta
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